2007 Mellon Awards for Technology Collaboration

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has launched the nominating process for the second annual Mellon Awards for Technology Collaboration (MATC). The awards, given by tech luminaries such as Tim Berners-Lee and Vint Cerf, honor not-for-profit organizations for leadership in the collaborative development of open source software tools with particular application to higher education and not-for-profit … Continue reading 2007 Mellon Awards for Technology Collaboration

NINES Officially Launches

As someone keenly interested in the possibilities of digital scholarship as well as nineteenth-century British and American intellectual history, I'm delighted to hear of the official launch of NINES (Networked Infrastructure for Nineteenth-century Electronic Scholarship), which allows researchers to search, organize, and annotate over 60,000 texts and images. A screencast of how to use Collex, … Continue reading NINES Officially Launches

Intelligence Analysts and Humanities Scholars

About halfway through the Chicago Colloquium on Digital Humanities and Computer Science last week, the always witty and insightful Martin Mueller humorously interjected: "I will go away from this conference with the knowledge that intelligence analysts and literary scholars are exactly the same." As the chuckles from the audience died down, the core truth of … Continue reading Intelligence Analysts and Humanities Scholars

Creating a Blog from Scratch, Part 5: What is XHTML, and Why Should I Care?

In prior posts in this series (1, 2, 3, and 4), I described with some glee my rash abandonment of common blogging software in favor of writing my own. For my purposes there seemed to be some key disadvantages to these popular packages, including an overemphasis on the calendar (I just saw the definition of … Continue reading Creating a Blog from Scratch, Part 5: What is XHTML, and Why Should I Care?

Creating a Blog from Scratch, Part 4: Searching for a Good Search

It often surprises those who have never looked at server logs (the detailed statistics about a website) that a tremendous percentage of site visitors come from searches. In the case of the Center for History and New Media, this is a staggering 400,000 unique visitors a month out of about one million. Furthermore, many of … Continue reading Creating a Blog from Scratch, Part 4: Searching for a Good Search

Creating a Blog from Scratch, Part 3: The Double Life of Blogs

In the first two posts in this series, I discussed the origins of blogs and how they led to certain elements in popular blog software that were in some cases good and in others bad for my own purposes—to start a blog that consisted of short articles on the intersection of digital technology, the humanities, … Continue reading Creating a Blog from Scratch, Part 3: The Double Life of Blogs

Creating a Blog from Scratch, Part 2: Advantages and Disadvantages of Popular Blog Software

In the first post in this series I briefly recounted the early history of blogs (all of five years ago) and noted how many of their current uses have diverged from two early incarnations (as a place to store interesting web links and as the online equivalent of a diary). Unfortunately, these early, dominant forms … Continue reading Creating a Blog from Scratch, Part 2: Advantages and Disadvantages of Popular Blog Software