A Conversation with Richard Stallman about Open Access

[An email exchange with Richard Stallman, father of free software, copyleft, GNU, and the GPL, reprinted here in redacted form with Stallman's permission. Stallman tutors me in the important details of open access and I tutor him in the peculiarities of humanities publishing.] RS: [Your] posting ["Open Access Publishing and Scholarly Values"] doesn't specify which … Continue reading A Conversation with Richard Stallman about Open Access

Peer Review and the Most Influential Publications

Thanks to Josh Greenberg, I've been mulling over this fascinating paper I missed from last winter about the relative impact of science articles published in three different ways in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). It speaks to the question of how important traditional peer review is, and how we might introduce … Continue reading Peer Review and the Most Influential Publications

Emerging Genres in Scholarly Communication

If you haven't read it already, I strongly recommend the recently released report from the eighth annual Scholarly Communication Institute, which tackled emerging genres in scholarly communication. Current print-based models of scholarly production, assessment, and publication have proven insufficient to meet the demands of scholars and students in the twenty-first century. In the humanities, what … Continue reading Emerging Genres in Scholarly Communication

Open Access Publishing and Scholarly Values

[A contribution to the Hacking the Academy book project. Tom Scheinfeldt and I are crowdsourcing the content of that book in one week.] In my post The Social Contract of Scholarly Publishing, I noted that there is a supply side and a demand side to scholarly communication: The supply side is the creation of scholarly … Continue reading Open Access Publishing and Scholarly Values

One Week, One Book: Hacking the Academy

[Reblogged from the THATCamp website. Please note that you don't need to be a THATCamper to participate. We are soliciting submissions from everyone, worldwide. Join us by writing something in the next week, or if you've already written something you think deserves to be included, let us know!] Tom Scheinfeldt and I have been brewing … Continue reading One Week, One Book: Hacking the Academy

The Social Contract of Scholarly Publishing

When Roy Rosenzweig and I finished writing a full draft of our book Digital History, we sat down at a table and looked at the stack of printouts. “So, what now?” I said to Roy naively. “Couldn’t we just publish what we have on the web with the click of a button? What value does … Continue reading The Social Contract of Scholarly Publishing

Introducing Digital Humanities Now

Do the digital humanities need journals? Although I'm very supportive of the new journals that have launched in the last year, and although I plan to write for them from time to time, there's something discordant about a nascent field—one so steeped in new technology and new methods of scholarly communication—adopting a format that is … Continue reading Introducing Digital Humanities Now