Activism, Community Input, and the Evolution of Cities: My Interview with Ted Landsmark

I've had a dozen great guests on the What's New podcast, but this week's episode features a true legend: Ted Landsmark. He is probably best known as the subject of a shocking Pulitzer Prize-winning photograph showing a gang of white teens at a rally against school desegregation attacking him with an American flag. The image … Continue reading Activism, Community Input, and the Evolution of Cities: My Interview with Ted Landsmark

The Significance of the Twitter Archive at the Library of Congress

It started with some techies casually joking around, and ended with the President of the United States being its most avid user. In between, it became the site of comedy and protest, several hundred million human users and countless bots, the occasional exchange of ideas and a constant stream of outrage. All along, the Library … Continue reading The Significance of the Twitter Archive at the Library of Congress

Roy’s World

In one of his characteristically humorous and self-effacing autobiographical stories, Roy Rosenzweig recounted the uneasy feeling he had when he was working on an interactive CD-ROM about American history in the 1990s. The medium was brand new, and to many in academia, superficial and cartoonish compared to a serious scholarly monograph. Roy worried about how his … Continue reading Roy’s World

George Boole at 200: The Emotion Behind the Logic

Today is the 200th anniversary of George Boole's birth, and he certainly merits a big celebration at University College Cork, where he was the first professor of mathematics, and even that rare honor: a Google Doodle. The focus has been on his technical breakthroughs, since his brilliant advances in mathematics and logic formed the foundation of modern computing. … Continue reading George Boole at 200: The Emotion Behind the Logic

Information Overload, Past and Present

The end of this year has seen much handwringing over the stress of information overload: the surging, unending streams, the inexorable decline of longer, more intermittent forms such as blogs, the feeling that our online presence is scattered and unmanageable. This worry spike had me scurrying back to Ann Blair's terrific history of pre-modern information … Continue reading Information Overload, Past and Present

Digital History at the 2013 AHA Meeting

It's time for my annual list of digital history sessions at the American Historical Association meeting, this year in New Orleans, January 3-6, 2013. This year's program extends last year's surging interest in the effect digital media and technology are having on research and the profession. In addition, a special track for the 2013 meeting … Continue reading Digital History at the 2013 AHA Meeting

Treading Water on Open Access

A statement from the governing council of the American Historical Association, September 2012: The American Historical Association voices concerns about recent developments in the debates over “open access” to research published in scholarly journals. The conversation has been framed by the particular characteristics and economics of science publishing, a landscape considerably different from the terrain … Continue reading Treading Water on Open Access