Digital Campus #29 – Making It Count

Tom, Mills, and I take up the much-debated issue of whether and how digital work should count toward promotion and tenure on this episode of the podcast. We also examine the significance of university presses putting their books on Amazon’s Kindle device, and the release of better copyright records. [Subscribe to this podcast.] Happy 4th … Continue reading Digital Campus #29 – Making It Count

Mass Digitization of Books: Exit Microsoft, What Next?

So Microsoft has left the business of digitizing millions of books—apparently because they saw it as no business at all. This leaves Microsoft's partner (and our partner on the Zotero project), the Internet Archive, somewhat in the lurch, although Microsoft has done the right thing and removed the contractual restrictions on the books they digitized … Continue reading Mass Digitization of Books: Exit Microsoft, What Next?

Still Waiting for a Real Google Book Search API

For years on this blog, at conferences, and even in direct conversations with Google employees I have been agitating for an API (application programming interface) for Google Book Search. (For a summary of my thoughts on the matter, see my imaginatively titled post, "Why Google Books Should Have an API.") With the world's largest collection … Continue reading Still Waiting for a Real Google Book Search API

Google Book Search Begins Adding Quality Control Measures

As predicted in this space six months ago, Google has added the ability for users to report missing or poorly scanned pages in their Book Search. (From my post "Google Books: Champagne or Sour Grapes?": "Just as they have recently added commentary to Google News, they could have users flag problematic pages.") I'll say it … Continue reading Google Book Search Begins Adding Quality Control Measures

The Case for Open Access Books

This month's First Monday has one of the most pragmatic, sensible articles I've read about the promise and perils of open access books. In "Open access book publishing in writing studies: A case study," by Charles Bazerman, David Blakesley, Mike Palmquist, and David Russell, the authors describe their experience deciding to eschew a traditional publication … Continue reading The Case for Open Access Books

MacEachern and Turkel, The Programming Historian

Bill Turkel, the always creative mind behind Digital History Hacks (logrolling disclosure: Bill is a friend of CHNM, a collaborator on various fronts, and was the thought-provoking guest on Digital Campus #9; still, he deserves the compliments), and his colleague at the University of Western Ontario, Alan MacEachern, are planning to write a book entitled … Continue reading MacEachern and Turkel, The Programming Historian