Where Are the Noncommercial APIs?

Readers of this blog know that one of my pet peeves as someone trying to develop software tools for scholars, teachers, and students is the lack of application programming interfaces (APIs) for educational resources. APIs greatly facilitate the use of these resources and allow third parties to create new services on top of them, such … Continue reading Where Are the Noncommercial APIs?

Wikipedia vs. Encyclopaedia Britannica Keyword Shootout Results

In my post "Wikipedia vs. Encyclopaedia Britannica for Digital Research", I asked you to compare two lists of significant keywords and phrases, derived from matching articles on George H. W. Bush in Wikipedia and the Encyclopaedia Britannica. Which one is a better keyword profile—a data mining list that could be used to find other documents … Continue reading Wikipedia vs. Encyclopaedia Britannica Keyword Shootout Results

Wikipedia vs. Encyclopaedia Britannica for Digital Research

In a prior post I argued that the recent coverage of Wikipedia has focused too much on one aspect of the online reference source's openness—the ability of anyone to edit any article—and not enough on another aspect of Wikipedia's openness—the ability of anyone to download or copy the entire contents of its database and use … Continue reading Wikipedia vs. Encyclopaedia Britannica for Digital Research

Creating a Blog from Scratch, Part 4: Searching for a Good Search

It often surprises those who have never looked at server logs (the detailed statistics about a website) that a tremendous percentage of site visitors come from searches. In the case of the Center for History and New Media, this is a staggering 400,000 unique visitors a month out of about one million. Furthermore, many of … Continue reading Creating a Blog from Scratch, Part 4: Searching for a Good Search

Do APIs Have a Place in the Digital Humanities?

Since the 1960s, computer scientists have used application programming interfaces (APIs) to provide colleagues with robust, direct access to their databases and digital tools. Access via APIs is generally far more powerful than simple web-based access. APIs often include complex methods drawn from programming languages—precise ways of choosing materials to extract, methods to generate statistics, … Continue reading Do APIs Have a Place in the Digital Humanities?