The Significance of the Twitter Archive at the Library of Congress

It started with some techies casually joking around, and ended with the President of the United States being its most avid user. In between, it became the site of comedy and protest, several hundred million human users and countless bots, the occasional exchange of ideas and a constant stream of outrage. All along, the Library … Continue reading The Significance of the Twitter Archive at the Library of Congress

Institutionalizing Digital Scholarship (or Anything Else New in a Large Organization)

I recently gave a talk at Brown University on “Institutionalizing Digital Scholarship,” and upon reflection it struck me that the lessons I tried to convey were more generally applicable. Everyone prefers to talk about innovation, rather than institutionalization, but the former can only have a long-term impact if the latter occurs. What at first seems … Continue reading Institutionalizing Digital Scholarship (or Anything Else New in a Large Organization)

Humility and Perspective-Taking: A Review of Alan Jacobs’s How to Think

In Alan Jacobs’s important new book How to Think: A Survival Guide for a World at Odds, he locates thought within our social context and all of the complexities that situation involves: our desire to fit into our current group or an aspirational in-group, our repulsion from other groups, our use of a communal (but … Continue reading Humility and Perspective-Taking: A Review of Alan Jacobs’s How to Think

Roy’s World

In one of his characteristically humorous and self-effacing autobiographical stories, Roy Rosenzweig recounted the uneasy feeling he had when he was working on an interactive CD-ROM about American history in the 1990s. The medium was brand new, and to many in academia, superficial and cartoonish compared to a serious scholarly monograph. Roy worried about how his … Continue reading Roy’s World

Introducing the What’s New Podcast

My new podcast, What's New, has launched, and I'm truly excited about the opportunity to explore new ideas and discoveries on the show. What's New will cover a wide range of topics, from the humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, and technology, and it is intended for anyone who wants to learn new things. I hope that you'll subscribe … Continue reading Introducing the What’s New Podcast

Age of Asymmetries

Cory Doctorow's 2008 novel Little Brother traces the fight between hacker teens and an overactive surveillance state emboldened by a terrorist attack in San Francisco. The novel details in great depth the digital tools of the hackers, especially the asymmetry of contemporary cryptography. Simply put, today's encryption is based on mathematical functions that are really easy in one direction—multiplying two prime numbers to get a … Continue reading Age of Asymmetries

Irrationality and Human-Computer Interaction

When the New York Times let it be known that their election-night meter—that dial displaying the real-time odds of a Democratic or Republican win—would return for Georgia's 6th congressional district runoff after its notorious November 2016 debut, you could almost hear a million stiff drinks being poured. Enabled by the live streaming of precinct-by-precinct election … Continue reading Irrationality and Human-Computer Interaction