Tony Grafton on Digital Texts and Reading

Anthony Grafton was the first person to turn me onto intellectual history. His seminar on ideas in the Renaissance was one of the most fascinating courses I took at Princeton, and I still remember well Tony rocking in his seat, looking a bit like a young Karl Marx, making brilliant connections among a broad array … Continue reading Tony Grafton on Digital Texts and Reading

Steven Johnson at the Italian Embassy

Well, they didn't have my favorite wine (Villa Cafaggio Chianti Classico Reserva, if you must know), but I had a nice evening at the Italian Embassy in Washington. The occasion was the start of a conference, "Using New Technologies to Explore Cultural Heritage," jointly sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Consiglio … Continue reading Steven Johnson at the Italian Embassy

Shakespeare’s Hard Drive

Congrats to Matt Kirschenbaum on his thought-provoking article in the Chronicle of Higher Education, "Hamlet.doc? Literature in a Digital Age." Matt makes two excellent points. First, "born digital" literature presents incredible new opportunities for research, because manuscripts written on computers retain significant metadata and draft tracking that allows for major insights into an author's thought … Continue reading Shakespeare’s Hard Drive

NINES Officially Launches

As someone keenly interested in the possibilities of digital scholarship as well as nineteenth-century British and American intellectual history, I'm delighted to hear of the official launch of NINES (Networked Infrastructure for Nineteenth-century Electronic Scholarship), which allows researchers to search, organize, and annotate over 60,000 texts and images. A screencast of how to use Collex, … Continue reading NINES Officially Launches