The Ivory Tower and the Open Web: Introduction: Burritos, Browsers, and Books [Draft]

[A draft of the introduction to my forthcoming book, The Ivory Tower and the Open Web, which looks at academic resistance to the modes and genres of the web, and how those modes and genres might actually reinvigorate the academy. I'll be posting drafts of chapters as well for open comment and criticism.] In the … Continue reading The Ivory Tower and the Open Web: Introduction: Burritos, Browsers, and Books [Draft]

Academic Theater (Reflections on TED & TEDxNYED)

This past weekend's TEDxNYED event in New York took place in the theater of a school just off Broadway. I couldn't help thinking about the symbolism of that location during the day's proceedings. TEDx, a spinoff regional program of the billionaires-and-brains edutainment summit in California, TED, pushes speakers like me towards theatrics. TEDxNYED was enjoyable … Continue reading Academic Theater (Reflections on TED & TEDxNYED)

WordCamp Ed: Conference on WordPress for Education

From CHNM's Dave Lester, one of founders of THATCamp: The Humanities and Technology Camp, comes WordCamp Ed: WordCamp conferences are taking the blogging community by storm as one-day events to meet fellow WordPress users in regional communities. WordCamp Ed has been organized to specifically focus on WordPress and Education. The day-long event to take place … Continue reading WordCamp Ed: Conference on WordPress for Education

Digital Campus #20 – Open to Change

Are open educational resources such as iTunes U and thought-provoking dot-coms such as BigThink.com a distraction from the mission of professors and universities, or the wave of the future? We debate the merits of “open access” intellectual content in the feature story on our twentieth Digital Campus podcast. Also, I report on the mostly good … Continue reading Digital Campus #20 – Open to Change

10 Most Popular Philosophy Syllabi

It's time once again to find the most influential syllabi in a discipline—this time, philosophy—as determined by data gleaned from the Syllabus Finder. As with my earlier analysis of the most popular history syllabi the following list was compiled by running a series of calculations to determine the number of times Syllabus Finder users glanced … Continue reading 10 Most Popular Philosophy Syllabi

“Legal Cheating” in the Wall Street Journal

In a forthcoming article in the Chronicle of Higher Education, Roy Rosenzweig and I argue that the ubiquity of the Internet in students' lives and advances in digital information retrieval threaten to erode multiple-choice testing, and much of standardized testing in general. A revealing article in this weekend's Wall Street Journal shows that some schools … Continue reading “Legal Cheating” in the Wall Street Journal