Second Year of Mason’s Digital History Doctoral Research Awards

I just wanted to remind potential doctoral students in history that George Mason University and the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media have Digital History Research Awards for students entering the History and Art History doctoral program. Students receiving these awards will get five years of fully funded studies, as follows: $20,000 research stipends in years 1 and 2; research […]

The Journal of Digital Humanities Hits Full Stride

If you haven’t checked out the Journal of Digital Humanities yet, now’s the time to do so. My colleagues Joan Fragaszy Troyano, Jeri Wieringa, and Sasha Hoffman, along with our new editors-at-large and the many scholars who have taken democratic ownership of this open-access journal, have quickly gotten the production model down to a science. There’s also […]

Treading Water on Open Access

A statement from the governing council of the American Historical Association, September 2012: The American Historical Association voices concerns about recent developments in the debates over “open access” to research published in scholarly journals. The conversation has been framed by the particular characteristics and economics of science publishing, a landscape considerably different from the terrain […]

Normal Science and Abnormal Publishing

When the Large Hadron Collider locates its elusive quarry under the sofa cushion of the universe, Nature will be there to herald the news of the new particle and the scientists who found it. But below these headline-worthy discoveries, something fascinating is going on in science publishing: the race, prompted by the hugely successful PLoS […]

One on One

I’m not going to try to name it (ahem), but I do want to highlight its existence while it’s still young: a new web genre in which one person recommends one thing (often for one day). It’s another manifestation of modern web minimalism, akin to what is happening in web design. We are sick of […]

A Conversation with Data: Prospecting Victorian Words and Ideas

[An open access, pre-print version of a paper by Fred Gibbs and myself for the Autumn 2011 volume of Victorian Studies. For the final version, please see Victorian Studies at Project MUSE.]   Introduction “Literature is an artificial universe,” author Kathryn Schulz recently declared in the New York Times Book Review, “and the written word, […]

The Blessay

Sorry, I don’t have a better name for it, but I feel it needs a succinct name so we can identify and discuss it. It’s not a tossed-off short blog post. It’s not a long, involved essay. It’s somewhere in-between: it’s a blessay. The blessay is a manifestation of the convergence of journalism and scholarship […]

Just the Text

This post marks the third major redesign of my site and its fourth incarnation. The site began more than a decade ago as a place to put some basic information about myself online. Not much happening in 2003: In 2005, I wrote some PHP scripts to add a simple homemade blog to the site: In […]

Catching the Good

[Another post in my series on our need to focus more on the “demand side” of scholarly communication—how and why scholars engage with and contribute to publications—in addition to new models for the “supply side”—new production models for publications themselves. If you’re new to this line of thought on my blog, you may wish to […]

Digital Journalism and Digital Humanities

I’ve increasingly felt that digital journalism and digital humanities are kindred spirits, and that more commerce between the two could be mutually beneficial. That sentiment was confirmed by the extremely positive reaction on Twitter to a brief comment I made on the launch of Knight-Mozilla OpenNews, including from Jon Christensen (of the Bill Lane Center […]

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