Rough Start for Digital Preservation

How hard will it be to preserve today’s digital record for tomorrow’s historians, researchers, and students? Judging by the preliminary results of some attempts to save for the distant future the September 11 Digital Archive (a project I co-directed), it won’t be easy. While there are some bright spots to the reports in D-Lib Magazine […]

Creating a Blog from Scratch, Part 4: Searching for a Good Search

It often surprises those who have never looked at server logs (the detailed statistics about a website) that a tremendous percentage of site visitors come from searches. In the case of the Center for History and New Media, this is a staggering 400,000 unique visitors a month out of about one million. Furthermore, many of […]

Creating a Blog from Scratch, Part 3: The Double Life of Blogs

In the first two posts in this series, I discussed the origins of blogs and how they led to certain elements in popular blog software that were in some cases good and in others bad for my own purposes—to start a blog that consisted of short articles on the intersection of digital technology, the humanities, […]

The Wikipedia Story That’s Being Missed

With all of the hoopla over Wikipedia in the recent weeks (covered in two prior posts), most of the mainstream as well as tech media coverage has focused on the openness of the democratic online encyclopedia. Depending on where you stand, this openness creates either a Wild West of publishing, where anything goes and facts […]

Creating a Blog from Scratch, Part 2: Advantages and Disadvantages of Popular Blog Software

In the first post in this series I briefly recounted the early history of blogs (all of five years ago) and noted how many of their current uses have diverged from two early incarnations (as a place to store interesting web links and as the online equivalent of a diary). Unfortunately, these early, dominant forms […]

Creating a Blog from Scratch, Part 1: What is a Blog, Anyway?

If you look at the bottom of this page, you won’t see any of the telltale signs that it is generated by a blog software package like Blogger, Moveable Type, or WordPress. When I was redesigning this site and wanted to add a blog to it, I made the perhaps foolhardy decision to write my […]

Nature Compares Science Entries in Wikipedia with Encyclopaedia Britannica

In an article published tomorrow, but online now, the journal Nature reveals the results of a (relatively small) study it conducted to compare the accuracy of Wikipedia with Encyclopaedia Britannica—at least in the natural sciences. The results may strike some as surprising. As Jim Giles summarizes in the special report: “Among 42 entries tested, the […]

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